Thursday, April 15, 2010

Rugged Beauty of the Caprock

Maybe it's because I grew up there, but I love the Texas Caprock, especially in spring. It is mostly unchanged from the last ice age; a living glimpse into the wild country our ancestors came across in their quest for adventure and their own land. The wheat is green and waving like a billowing sheet of velvet, changing from dark to lighter shades of green as gusts of wind roll across it; and the plains are rocky, dotted with cactus and sagebrush.

Please excuse the pictures, my good camera was packed in my suitcase.

There are buffalo (this one is cooling in a wallow)



but very few real trees. There are some mesquite and scrub oak, but it's a sure bet that any tall trees were planted by someone, and usually indicate the location of a house or windbreak.


Cattle. Lots of cattle. New calves are cute but that's where the appeal ends. Cattle aren't very bright. I think this one is eating an electric cord. (Don't worry, there was a ranch truck right across the street taking care of things.)


The flat plain of the caprock gives way to rocky ravines and sharp cliffs which carve the sides of the caprock, ending again in a rolling plain below. You can see for miles on top, but it seems like you can see the world spread out in front of you when standing on the edge of the caprock. (These two pictures are much better if you click on them to enlarge.)




On the plains at the bottom of the caprock are buttes sculpted by glaciers. (Shot through the windshield so there is some reflection.)



And something new this year: Canola plants. Very pretty. I approve.



Until next time, may you have blessings and joy in the beauty around you,
Marti

No comments: